Covid-19

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/your-health-sm.jpg Protect yourself and others from Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person. There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Source link
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg What You Need to Know COVID-19 vaccines are available for everyone ages 5 years and older at no cost. Vaccines were paid for with taxpayer dollars and will be given free of charge to all people living in the United States, regardless of insurance or immigration status. COVID-19 vaccination is an important tool to
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit for School Settings and Childcare Programs Information and materials for school districts, administrators, teachers, school staff, and other education and childcare professionals, to help promote COVID-19 vaccination and address common questions and concerns. View Toolkit Source link
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg What You Should Know about Vaccines You can help protect yourself and the people around you by getting vaccinated. COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective in preventing severe illness from COVID-19. Depending on the kind of COVID-19 vaccine you get, you might need a second shot 3 or 4 weeks after your first shot.
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/different-vaccines-vials_600px.png?_=71219 Additional Recommendations for Immunocompromised People Additional primary dose: Moderately to severely immunocompromised people who are 12 years and older and received a Pfizer-BioNTech primary series or 18 years and older and received a Moderna primary series should receive an additional primary dose of the same vaccine at least 28 days after their second dose.
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg CDC and its partners are actively monitoring reports of myocarditis and pericarditis after COVID-19 vaccination. Active monitoring includes reviewing data and medical records and evaluating the relationship to COVID-19 vaccination. Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle, and pericarditis is inflammation of the outer lining of the heart. In both cases, the body’s immune system causes inflammation in response
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg CDC has expanded recommendations for booster shots to now include all adults ages 18 years and older who received a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccine as part of their primary series. Get more information and read CDC’s media statement. What You Need to Know If you receive a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine,
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/your-health-sm.jpg Are You Fully Vaccinated for Air Travel to the United States? You are considered fully vaccinated: 2 weeks (14 days) after your dose of an accepted single-dose vaccine 2 weeks (14 days) after your second dose of an accepted 2-dose series 2 weeks (14 days) after you received the full series of an accepted
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg Scheduling Vaccination Appointments Most vaccination providers schedule vaccination appointments online. To schedule your COVID-19 vaccination appointment, visit vaccine providers online scheduling services. If you have a question about scheduling your vaccination appointment contact a vaccination provider directly. CDC cannot schedule a vaccination appointment. CDC cannot assist with verifying, rescheduling, or cancelling your vaccination appointment. If you need
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg Plan and Prepare for Your COVID-19 Vaccination Get Vaccinated Even If You Have Had COVID-19 You should get a COVID-19 vaccine, even if you have already had COVID-19 because: Research has not yet shown how long you are protected from getting COVID-19 again after you recover from COVID-19. Vaccination helps protect you even if
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/underlying-conditions_600px.png?_=67613 Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-expect-appointment_600px.jpg?_=89323 Learn what to expect during and after your vaccination, what documents your provider will give you, and how to report side effects. Source link
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-pregnant-breastfeeding_600px.jpg?_=14391 People who are Pregnant COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for people who are pregnant. People who are pregnant may also receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine can protect you from severe illness from COVID-19, and a healthy mom is important for a healthy baby. If you are pregnant, you might want
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/COVID-19-SM-1200px.jpg The virus that causes COVID-19 is constantly changing, and new variants of the virus are expected to occur. Sometimes new variants emerge and disappear. Other times, new variants persist. Numerous variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are being tracked in the United States and globally during this pandemic. Source link
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/COVID-19-SM-1200px.jpg On July 27, 2021, CDC released updated guidance on the need for urgently increasing COVID-19 vaccination coverage and a recommendation for everyone in areas of substantial or high transmission to wear a mask in public indoor places, even if they are fully vaccinated. CDC issued this new guidance due to several concerning developments and newly
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https://www.kff.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/FEATURE-Vaccine-Monitor-Employer-Vaccine-Requirements_1-1.png The KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor is an ongoing research project tracking the public’s attitudes and experiences with COVID-19 vaccinations. Using a combination of surveys and qualitative research, this project tracks the dynamic nature of public opinion as vaccine development and distribution unfold, including vaccine confidence and acceptance, information needs, trusted messengers and messages, as
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg CDC and Medical Professionals Recommend COVID-19 Vaccination for People Who Want to Have Children COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for people who are trying to get pregnant now or might become pregnant in the future, as well as their partners. Professional medical organizations serving people of reproductive age, including adolescents, emphasize that there is no
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https://www.kff.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Drew-Quote-Axios-5-11-vaccine.png In this Axios column, Drew Altman examines the data about what parents say they will do once their children ages 5-11 become eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine, and why it will take some time and a concerted outreach effort by pediatricians, schools, local media, public health groups and other trusted sources to match adult vaccination
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https://www.kff.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/FEATURE-At-Home-COVID-Testing.png While rapid home COVID-19 tests have been identified as an important component of controlling the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, there have been ongoing supply challenges in the U.S. Challenges in accessing rapid home tests became more acute as the Delta variant took hold, vaccination rates stagnated, and cases, hospitalizations, and
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/if-you-are-sick/Twitter.jpg?_=06393 Although we still have much to learn about the risks of COVID-19 for newborns of people with COVID-19, we do know these facts: People who are pregnant or recently pregnant are more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19 compared with people who are not pregnant. People who have COVID-19 during pregnancy are also
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https://www.kff.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/FEATURE-Most-Republicans-Think-U.S.-Is-Doing-Enough-To-Help-Provide-COVID-19_1.png Overview The Biden administration has stated its intention to help combat the COVID-19 pandemic around the world and recently convened a global summit to set global targets and announce new commitments. The U.S. has pledged more COVID-19 vaccine doses and funding than any other country. In the latest KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor, we find
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg What You Need to Know People who are immunocompromised are especially vulnerable to COVID-19. Immunocompromised people ages 5 years and older should receive a COVID-19 vaccine primary series as soon as possible. Moderately to severely immunocompromised people ages 18 years and older who completed their Moderna vaccine primary series should plan to get an
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https://www.kff.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/FEATUREDpercent-of-fully-vaccinated-people-who-received-a-booster-additional-dose-by-race-ethnicity-as-of-november-2-2021.png As of October 21, 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended that people who received the Pfizer-BioNtech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine receive a booster shot if they are age 65 years and older, have underlying medical conditions that put them at higher risk for severe illness, or are in high-risk occupational
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg What You Need to Know CDC is conducting surveys of patients (or their parents or guardians) and healthcare providers to gather information about myocarditis after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination. CDC is contacting people who meet the case definition for myocarditis following mRNA COVID-19 vaccination. CDC is actively investigating reports of people developing myocarditis (inflammation of the
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https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2021/11/04/gettyimages-1235247551_wide-773df4ce4d9a3f79eae44584d407c805e6e7fc36.jpg?s=1400 The U.K. says it’s the first country to approve an oral antiviral medication to fight COVID-19. “This is important, because it means it can be administered outside of a hospital setting, before COVID-19 has progressed to a severe stage,” said MHRA Chief Executive Dr. June Raine. Justin Tallis/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption toggle
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https://www.kff.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/FEATURE-One-Third-Are-Unsure-About-Vaxx_1.png The KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor is an ongoing research project tracking the public’s attitudes and experiences with COVID-19 vaccinations. Using a combination of surveys and qualitative research, this project tracks the dynamic nature of public opinion as vaccine development and distribution unfold, including vaccine confidence and acceptance, information needs, trusted messengers and messages, as
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