Covid-19

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/your-health-sm.jpg Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/social-media/covid-sm-community.png Section 4: General Considerations for All IHEs This section is intended for all IHEs regardless of policy on COVID-19 vaccination. The considerations included here will help IHEs to prevent any infectious illness transmission among students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Infection Testing to rapidly detect and isolate infectious individuals can reduce transmission
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/social-media/covid-hcp-sm.png Considerations When Testing SARS-CoV-2 testing may be incorporated as part of a comprehensive approach to reducing transmission. Symptom screening, testing, and contact tracing are strategies to identify people infected with SARS-CoV-2 so that actions can be taken to slow and stop the spread of the virus. People undergoing testing should receive clear information on The manufacturer
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/social-media/covid-hcp-sm.png As of February 18, 2021 Some severely immunocompromised persons with COVID-19 may remain infectious beyond 20 days after their symptoms began and require additional SARS-CoV-2 testing and consultation with infectious diseases specialists and infection control experts. Updates as of July 20, 2020 A test-based strategy is no longer recommended to determine when to discontinue
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/your-health-sm.jpg There are several things to consider when deciding whether it is safe for you to travel in the United States. This includes the following: is COVID-19 spreading where you’re going, will you be in close contact with others, are you at higher risk of severe illness if you do get COVID-19, do you have
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/your-health-sm.jpg Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/different-vaccines-vials_600px.png?_=71219 Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection. But with all types of vaccines, the body is left with a supply of “memory” T-lymphocytes as well as B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus in the future. It typically takes a few weeks after vaccination for the body to
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccination-program_600px.png?_=60143 COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series The number of vaccine doses you need depends on which vaccine you receive. Two doses of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine should be given 3 weeks (21 days) apart. Two doses of Moderna vaccine should be given 4 weeks (28 days) apart. Only one dose of Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen (J&J/Janssen) vaccine should be given.
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/social-media/covid-sm-community.png CDC has archived several workplace-related guidance documents, factsheets, and toolkits. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provides resources to prevent COVID-19 exposure and infection in the workplace. For the most current requirements, guidance, and tools, see OSHA COVID-19 Resourcesexternal icon. Source link
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/forum/get-vaccinated-vsafe_600px.png?_=09102 v-safe Overview V-safe is a smartphone-based tool that uses text messaging and web surveys to give personalized health check-ins after you receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Through v-safe, you can quickly tell CDC if you have any side effects after getting a COVID-19 vaccine. This information helps CDC monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/different-vaccines-vials_600px.png?_=71219 Salt, sugar, acid stabilizers, and acid: Sodium acetate Sucrose (basic table sugar) Tromethamine Tromethamine hydrochloride Acetic acid (the main ingredient in white household vinegar) PurposeWork together to help keep the vaccine molecules stable while the vaccine is manufactured, frozen, shipped, and stored until it is ready to be given to a vaccine recipient. Source
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/different-vaccines-vials_600px.png?_=71219 Facts About COVID-19 Viral Vector Vaccines COVID-19 viral vector vaccines cannot give someone the virus that causes COVID-19 or other viruses. COVID-19 viral vectors cannot cause infection with COVID-19 or with the virus used as the vaccine vector.  They do not affect or interact with our DNA in any way. The genetic material delivered
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/your-health-sm.jpg People who have recovered from COVID-19 can continue to test positive for up to 3 months after their infection. CDC does not recommend retesting within 3 months after a person with COVID-19 first developed symptoms of COVID-19 (or the date their sample was taken for their first positive viral diagnostic test if their infection was
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccine-you-are-essential_600px.png?_=97632 Implementing COVID-19 Vaccination in Your Community? Resources are available to help employers. The National Forum on COVID-19 Vaccine has shared a variety of materials and resources to help provide COVID-19 vaccine equitably, effectively, and quickly to as many people as possible in communities across the country. Source link
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/community/toolkits/326162-F_Home_Updated_brandingSM.jpg?_=19309 Resources and tools to help pregnant people, breastfeeding women and new parents caring for infants to protect their health and help people who serve these communities communicate with them. Source link
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg CDC is tracking vaccine distribution and administration CDC is using both new and existing information technology (IT) systems to collect reliable, rapid data about COVID-19 vaccines. CDC reports COVID-19 vaccine doses delivered and doses administered in the United States publicly through the COVID Data Tracker: COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States. CDC also reports
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg Ask open-ended questions to explore their concerns Open-ended questions are meant to elicit more than a yes-or-no answer. Asking open-ended questions can help you understand what your friend or family member is worried about, where they learned any troubling information, and what they have done to get answers to their questions. For example, you
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/vaccines/social-media/vaccines-Social-Media-new.jpg Clinical Trials After initial development, vaccines go through three phases of clinical trials to make sure they are safe and effective. For other vaccines routinely used in the United States, the three phases of clinical trials are performed one at a time. During the development of COVID-19 vaccines, these phases overlapped to speed up the
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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/images/your-health-sm.jpg Protect yourself and others from Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person. There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Source link
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