Facilities Feeling the Effects of Flushing PPE Down the Toilet | Cleaning &


The custodial industry is not a newcomer to the bizarre items people flush down the toilet. During the coronavirus pandemic there has been an increase of flushed personal protective equipment (PPE) items, the Jacksonville Business Journal reports.

According to AQUALIS, a nationwide provider of stormwater and lift station management services, flushed PPE have created backups and blockages in underground sanitary infrastructure. PPE items like face masks, gloves, and sanitizing wipes are being dumped into lift stations and pump stations across the country at an increase rate compared to February 2020.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently released a statement discouraging flushing PPE and anything else other than toilet paper. However, the problem continues. Commercial facilities with the highest cases of flushed PPE include health care facilities, retailers, and restaurants, according to AQUALIS.

The following technological advancements and facility manager actions can help prevent backups, clogs, and flooding due to flushed PPE:

  • Increase awareness and education regarding proper disposal of PPE, such as posting “do not flush” signs in restrooms.
  • Ensure proper and routine inspections of lift stations to address system functionality.
  • Use sewer grinder technology equipped with cutter technology to eliminate frequent emergency services. This technology can also prevent clogging, costly repairs, , and property damages.

Deploy Internet of Things technology to monitor and control system pumps remotely through cellphones and email systems.


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Read More:Facilities Feeling the Effects of Flushing PPE Down the Toilet | Cleaning &

Facilities Feeling the Effects of Flushing PPE Down the Toilet | Cleaning &


The custodial industry is not a newcomer to the bizarre items people flush down the toilet. During the coronavirus pandemic there has been an increase of flushed personal protective equipment (PPE) items, the Jacksonville Business Journal reports.

According to AQUALIS, a nationwide provider of stormwater and lift station management services, flushed PPE have created backups and blockages in underground sanitary infrastructure. PPE items like face masks, gloves, and sanitizing wipes are being dumped into lift stations and pump stations across the country at an increase rate compared to February 2020.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently released a statement discouraging flushing PPE and anything else other than toilet paper. However, the problem continues. Commercial facilities with the highest cases of flushed PPE include health care facilities, retailers, and restaurants, according to AQUALIS.

The following technological advancements and facility manager actions can help prevent backups, clogs, and flooding due to flushed PPE:

  • Increase awareness and education regarding proper disposal of PPE, such as posting “do not flush” signs in restrooms.
  • Ensure proper and routine inspections of lift stations to address system functionality.
  • Use sewer grinder technology equipped with cutter technology to eliminate frequent emergency services. This technology can also prevent clogging, costly repairs, , and property damages.

Deploy Internet of Things technology to monitor and control system pumps remotely through cellphones and email systems.


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–>



Read More:Facilities Feeling the Effects of Flushing PPE Down the Toilet | Cleaning &